Chesnutt Archives Open House October 27th – 30th | October is #NCArchives Month (10.24.2014)

Octovber is #NCArchives Month - Archives and Special Collections, Chesnutt Library, Fayetteville State University (10.7.2014)

The Archives and Special Collections will host an open house on October 27th – 30th from 9am-4pm.

Contact: Amber Covington | acovin17@uncfsu.edu

#FlashbackFriday | Amber Covington (#ChesnuttArchives) Recounts Day Spent at 2014 THATCamp Piedmont at Davidson College (10.24.2014)

On Saturday, October 18th I attended THATCamp Piedmont at Davidson College. This daylong session included several discussions about digital humanities among people interested in collaborating, building, and sharing their ideas from a range of disciplines and specialties.

(Amber Covington seated second from the left)

From the start I immediately started learning about interesting websites and mobile applications that could be used to enhance archival collections. Here are a few things that sparked my interest throughout the day.

Digital Mapping

In this session I was able to get hands on experience using free open source online resources such as omeka.net and Neatline. I was able to try my skills at creating a digital map using special collection items.

Dorkshorts and Hackathon

Dorkshorts refers to a short period of time for campers, the name for people attending THATCamp, to share and tell others about things they have learned or projects they are working on.  The Hackathon is a daylong event where campers brainstorm, create, and design a product. During this time I was introduced to the mobile application Yik Yak and the way college campuses use it and other several websites of digital projects of campers which included IndiegogoGatheringPoint, and Internet Archive Book Images.

3-D Printing

During the 3-D printing session I was able to view and attempt to design an item using Tinkercad and Thingiverse.

THATCamp stands for “The Humanities and Technology Camp.” A day is spent learning in an unconference setting where individuals plan and discuss topics following an agenda and schedule very loosely. Interested in learning more about THATCamp please visit the website here.

Amber Covington. Archives and Special Collections, Chesnutt Library, Fayetteville State University

 

[REVISED] #ChesnuttLibrary Goes Pink on October 22nd, Library Staff Invites You to Join Annual Breast Cancer Awareness Day (10.20.2014)

On Wednesday October 22nd, 2014 and in conjunction with the FSU-wide awareness day, Chesnutt Library staff will collectively wear pink to bring awareness to Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Chesnutt Library has celebrated Pink Day since 2009.  See Chesnutt Library staff on Pink Day in 2010 and 2013.

 

Breast Cancer Awareness, Pink Day, Chesnutt Library, Fayetteville State University (10.20.2014)

 

 Contact: Angela Rich | Chesnutt Library, Employee Incentive Committee

#ThrowbackThursday | Archives Student Spotlight: Fayetteville History, The Market House (10.16.2014)

Biggs, Archie A. “[Old Market House, Hay, Green, Person & Gillespie Streets, Fayetteville,  Cumberland County, NC.]” Photograph. 1937. From Library of Congress: Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record/ Historic American Landscapes Survey. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/nc0020.photos.314226p/ (accessed October 07, 2014).

Old Market House, Hay, Green, Person & Gillespie Streets, Fayetteville, Cumberland County, NC. | Archives Student Spotlight | Fayetteville History: The Market House (10.16.2014)

Written by: Bianca Monroe, Student

Edited by: Amber Covington, Archives Assistant

One of the books I read while researching the Market House was “The Story of Fayetteville” by John Oates. This book went over how the Market House was the town’s market at the time, and how goods and groceries were sold there to the public, much like what we have today. However, today we have Food Lions, Walmarts, Harris Teeters, and plenty more. Not only was the Market House a place to sell items and goods to the public, but it was also used to auction slaves.

Read Bianca’s entire narrative here on the Chesnutt Library Tumblr.

#ChesnuttArchives | Student Spotlight: Shayla Boyd Demonstrates How to Use Microfilm Machine (10.15.2014)

Has your research lead you to look through old newspapers and journals on microfilm?

Watch the video of Archives Student, Shayla Boyd who takes you through the process of using a microfilm machine.

See the full video here on the Chesnutt Library Tumblr.

#ChesnuttLibrary Goes Pink on October 21st, Library Staff Invites You to Join Annual Breast Cancer Awareness Day (10.15.2014)

On Tuesday October 21st, 2014, Chesnutt Library staff will collectively wear pink to bring awareness to Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Chesnutt Library has celebrated Pink Day since 2009.  See Chesnutt Library staff on Pink Day in 2010 and 2013.

Breast Cancer Awareness 2014 | Annual #ChesnuttLibrary Pink Day October 21st, Library Staff Invites You to Join Breast Cancer Awareness (10.15.2013)

Join us as we celebrate our annual Pink Day!

 Contact: Angela Rich | Chesnutt Library, Employee Incentive Committee

#ChesnuttArchives Lady Bowlers Exhibit Featured on FSU Athletics Website (10.14.2014)

#ChesnuttArchives - FSU Lady Bowlers Display via fsubroncos.com

“Broncos’ Bowling earning well deserved spotlight”

Archives Assistant, Amber Covington, arranged an attractive display on the 1st floor of the Chesnutt Library. The display features FSU’s Lady Bowlers and is in the spirit of NC Archives Month 2014 — North Carolina at Play: Health and Leisure in Our State.

On Wednesday, October 8th,2014,  the Bowling Team stopped by Chesnutt Library for a photo with the display. News of the Archives display made it to the Broncos Athletics website and Bowling page on October 13th.

The display will be up and available for viewing through November 7th.

 Contact: Amber Covington, Archives Assistant

#LibTECH: There’s an App For That | Inserting Citations Using Google Docs (10.14.2014)

Do you use Google Docs (Google Drive) to create papers for class? Google Docs now has the capability to cite articles found online. Here is how to use this tool in Google Docs:

  1. Open a Document in Google Docs. Then select the Tools menu from the bar and select Research.

#LibTECH: There’s an App For That | Inserting Citations using Google Docs (10.14.2014) - Chesnutt Library, (googledocsciting1)

  1. Search for the article or paper you are using in the Google Scholar search bar.

#LibTECH: There’s an App For That | Inserting Citations using Google Docs (10.14.2014) - Chesnutt Library (googledocsciting_2)

  1. Select the article or paper and click “Cite as footnote” or “Insert.” Be sure to select the citing style you prefer (MLA, APA, or Chicago) using the drop down menu.

#LibTECH: There’s an App For That | Inserting Citations using Google Docs (10.14.2014) - Chesnutt Library (googledocsciting_3)

 

Learn more about citing using Google Docs here.

You can also use Chesnutt Library resources to cite. Bookmark our How to Cite LibGuide!

Last Week On Instagram | Roundup of @ChesnuttLibrary (10.13.2014)

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 Follow #ChesnuttLibrary on Instagram and Twitter!

 

#ChesnuttArchives | FSU History: Founding Fathers — Thomas Henry Lomax

#ChesnuttArchives, FSU History: Founding Fathers Thomas Henry Lomax, Archives and Special Collection, Chesnutt Library, Fayetteville State University (10.10.2014)

“An energetic worker… he is very calculative and far-seeing, is energetic and persevering, seldom fails in his calculations. He is in his personal character open and frank; as a preacher he is plain, practical, orthodox, unpretending and earnest”[1]

A donor, a leader, a Bishop? A man barely known by his name today was once a notable figure in North Carolina. He was instrumental in the beginnings of the African American religious denomination: African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in North Carolina. Bishop Thomas Henry Lomax is documented as one of the seven founders of the Howard School in Fayetteville, North Carolina. His signature’s presence on the deed of the Howard School demonstrates him as a stakeholder in the community during the 1800s in Cumberland County.

Read more on the Chesnutt Library Tumblr here.