Librarian Blogs: Summer Visit to University Archives, Remembering the Rev. James Gordon Smith and His Son (10.15.2013)

This summer, Mrs. Pearl Parker (researcher and family member) visited the University Archives at Fayetteville State University. In addition to conducting research, Mrs. Parker sent us a seven page vitae on John Milton Smith which also includes information about his father, Rev. James Gordon Smith, who signed the deed for the property on which the Howard School was built.

An excerpt from Mrs. Parker’s correspondence* sent to University Archivist, Craig Tuttle:

(…) I would like to visit your archives and request time to view items within the collection that were written by my grandmother Ella J. Smith, and grandfather Rev. J.G. Smith (James Gordon Smith).  They worked for the institution during the late 1800s/early 1990s.

Also, my father Dr. John Milton Smith graduated from the Fayetteville State Normal School in 1928.  I would like to search for any items you may have on his graduating class, and possibly my uncles Arlando Cooper Smith and Alva Gordon Smith.

Librarian Blogs: Summer Visit to the University Archives Special Collections, Remembering the Rev. James Gordon Smith and His Son

Standing: left to right – Alva Smith, John Smith, Arlando Smith; seated: James Gordon Smith

The Rev. James Gordon Smith was born in Chatham County, North Carolina near the town of Haywood. His son, Dr. John Milton Smith, was born in Fayetteville in 1910 and attended Fayetteville State Normal where he graduated in 1927. Dr. Smith continued his education at Lincoln University where he earned a B.A. in 1931 and a second Bachelors in 1934. He obtained his first Masters in 1936. Dr. Smith earned a second Masters from Western Presbyterian Seminary/University of Pittsburgh and then a PhD in Religion from the University of Iowa in 1941.

Librarian Blogs: Summer Visit to the University Archives Special Collections, Remembering the Rev. James Gordon Smith and His Son

Craig Tuttle, University Archivist and Mrs. Pearl Parker

*Published with permission.

Chesnutt Librarian Blogs, #ChesnuttLibrary

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